Natural Resources Announcements

The Tribe seeks comments on the proposed antidegradation decision related to the TransCanada Sink Hole Mitigation Project resultant from remediation needed to address sink holes on Line 200. The proposed project involves backfilling the sink holes with bentonite chips around the pipe and filling the rest of the hole with native or select fill. The exposed soils at the surface will be recontoured and reseeded, and erosion and sedimentation controls will be installed. There are two project sites where sink holes must be remediated along TransCanada’s right-of-way: one on the east slope of the White River floodplain and one on the east slope of the Bad River floodplain. (Read More)

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT On July 6, 2011, the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians adopted Water Quality Standards (WQS) aligned with the Clean Water Act.  One of the three key components of the WQS is the designated uses that describe the Tribe’s management objectives for Reservation waters.  The wild rice designated use applies to surface waters that support, or have the potential to support, wild rice habitat.  For more information on WQS, (click here).

The Bad River Tribe’s Natural Resources Department developed a map to illustrate the applicability of the antidegradation tiers within the Reservation and to display the waters with the wild rice designated use.   (Map link)

Learn more about Free & Open Source Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping solutions in Indian Country.  Check out this presentation Kim Sundeen (past GIS Specialist with the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Indians) gave at last year's Wisconsin Land Information Association (WLIA) Conference in Green Bay, WI on Feb. 20th, 2015.

PUBLIC NOTICE   On July 6, 2011, the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians adopted Water Quality Standards (WQS). One of the three key components of the WQS is an antidegradation policy, which protects existing uses and prevents clean waters from being unnecessarily degraded.

 

Class I Air Redesignation Proposal for the Bad River Reservation

Posted: 16 January 2015

 

 

The Class I Analysis report has been posted online (link) at 08:00 on January 16, 2015. Public hearings have been scheduled for March 18 and 19. The comment period closes at 16:30 on May 1, 2015. Additional details are described in the public notice (Read More)

 

 

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On July 6, 2011, the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians adopted Water Quality Standards (WQS). One of the three key components of the WQS is an antidegradation policy, which protects existing uses and prevents clean waters from being unnecessarily degraded.

The Natural Resources Department announces its Kakagon River Walleye Consumption Advice.  The advice is based on the analysis of walleye collected from the Kakagon River during 2011 and 2012.  Colors were assigned to the Kakagon River based on the methods used to assign colors to inland lakes for the GLIFWC Mercury Maps.  The resulting advice is that the Kakagon River is "blue"(up to 8 meals of walleye per month) for the general population and "yellow" (up to 2 meals of walleye per month) for sensitive populations.  Thes results are also available at the Bad River Fish Hatchery.

 

If you have any questions, please direct them to:

Tim Wilson
Fisheries Specialist
Bad River Natural Resources Department
72682 Maple Street, Odanah, WI 54861
Office: (715) 682-7123 Fax: (715) 682-7118
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web link to map of Tribal road closures:  http://www.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=4b8ddc5570e7405c80fd239613b035b0

EMERGENCY RULE

 

On May 9, 2012 Bad River Tribal Council approved an emergency rule prohibiting the harvest of wolves within the exterior boundary of the Bad River Reservation until further notice.

 

Posted by Bad River Natural Resources Department 9:30 A.M. Thursday May 10, 2012.


On July 6, 2011, the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians adopted Water Quality Standards (WQS).  One of the three key components of the WQS is an antidegradation policy, which protects existing uses and prevents clean waters from being unnecessarily degraded.  Under the antidegradation policy, each waterbody is assigned to a tier that provides a basis for addressing activities that would, or have the potential to, lower the quality of a body of water.  Tiers identified in the Tribe’s antidegradation policy include: Outstanding Tribal Resource Waters (Tier 3 waters), Outstanding Resource Waters (Tier 2.5 waters), and Exceptional Resource Waters (Tier 2 waters).   

New or increased discharges may be allowed in Outstanding Resource Waters and Exceptional Resource Waters if the applicable antidegradation demonstration and decision requirements are met.  Refer to provisions E.3.i., E.4.ii., E.4.iii., and E.5.i. in the Tribe’s WQS.

The Tribe seeks comments on the proposed antidegradation decision related to the Tribe’s New Odanah Water Tower Construction project designed by Indian Health Service.  The proposed project includes the construction of a 250,000 gallon water tower sphere and all necessary connection piping, security fencing, and gravel access drive.  The construction of this new water tower will increase the static pressure throughout the drinking water system and provided the recommended fire flow protection for the New Odanah and Diaperville communities.  The proposed project is located in the vicinity of water resources (i.e., tributary to Denomie Creek).  The proposed location for the project is north of Mishomis Road, east of the Nokomis Road intersection.  After the completion of this new water tower, two water storage tanks located in New Odanah will be dismantled and removed. 

To minimize the potential loading that may occur during the implementation of the proposed project, temporary erosion and sedimentation controls will be properly installed and maintained until soils are stabilized.  Additional best management practices (BMPs) will be implemented, including minimization of the workspace. 

As the Tribe’s New Odanah Water Tower Construction project meets the antidegradation demonstration requirements and decision criteria described in the Tribe’s WQS, the proposed antidegradation decision is an approval of this project if implemented in a manner consistent with conditions proposed to minimize potential impacts to the water resources.  Additional information can be obtained by contacting the Water Resources Specialist at (715) 682-7123 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Written comments can be sent via email or post office to:

Water Resources Specialist

Bad River Tribe’s Natural Resources Department

P.O. Box 39

Odanah, WI 54861

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Comment deadline is May 2, 2017.

View full PDF here

April 5, 2012

Contact: Mike Wiggins, Jr., 715-682-7111, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Over 10,000 Acres of Lake Superior Habitat Internationally Recognized

The Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs was recently recognized as a Wetland of International Importance, or a Ramsar site! Often called the Everglades of the North, the Sloughs mark the first Ramsar site to be owned by a tribe.


 

wild rice

Wild rice growing in the Sloughs. Photo courtesy of the Bad River Natural Resources Department.

The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance is a treaty initiated in Ramsar, Iran, in 1971 that provides for international cooperation among 160 countries for the conservation and wise use of wetlands. The Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs complex was one of the exceptional wetlands recently designated as a Ramsar site, bringing the total to 2,000 Ramsar sites worldwide! To learn more about Ramsar sites, visit: www.ramsar.org.

 

When asked about the importance of the Sloughs and reaching this milestone, Tribal Chairman, Mike Wiggins, Jr., commented:

“The Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs wetland complex represent everything our Tribal People hold dear and sacred on many different levels. Spiritually, the ‘place’ and everything it has, the clean water, the winged, the seasons, the rice and fish, connects us with our ancestors and the Creator. The Sloughs sustain the physical well-being of our community with foods such as wild rice, fish, cranberries, waterfowl, venison, and medicines. From an Anishinabe (Chippewa) world-view perspective, the wetlands ecosystem is a tangible representation of our values of caring for the environment. The international Ramsar recognition is an honor for the Bad River Band and maybe even more importantly, the recognition sends a message about the importance and critical need for biologically productive and water rich areas such as the Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs wetland complex. There is water purification, ecological harmony, and people who are interwoven into this ‘place’ where the Bad River Reservation dovetails with Lake Superior.”

 

The Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs easily fulfilled criteria established to identify Ramsar sites. The diversity of wetland types in the Sloughs complex lends to its unique and rare features, such as vast beds of wild rice (Manomin), spawning habitat for lake sturgeon (Name), and stopover habitat for numerous migratory birds. Comprising a significant portion of the remaining Lake Superior coastal wetlands, the Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs is critical to supporting the biodiversity of Lake Superior fisheries.


 

sloughs

 

Bird’s eye view of the Sloughs. Photo courtesy of Jim Meeker.

The Bad River Tribe worked closely with partners, such as the Wisconsin Wetlands Association (www.wisconsinwetlands.org), to assist in designating the Sloughs as a Ramsar site. Almost 3 years after the process was initiated, the Ramsar designation was approved on World Wetlands Day, February 2, 2012.

Located in the downstream portion of the Bad River Watershed, the Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs face a multitude of health and environmental challenges, such as mining and a changing climate. The Ramsar designation and federally-approved water quality standards are two important milestones in the protection and enhancement of the Kakagon and Bad River Sloughs.


eagle

 

Immature bald eagle perched in the Kakagon Sloughs. Photo courtesy of the Bad River Natural Resources Department.



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